CSPO News

  • A Vision for the Future

    Taking On Big Questions

    Congress established the National Science Foundation in 1950 to “promote the progress of science; advance the national health, prosperity, and welfare; secure the national defense; and for other purposes.” What’s the best way to ensure that NSF fulfills this mandate?

  • At the Vanguard

    National Science Foundation Director Sethuraman Panchanathan spoke with Issues about about his vision for the agency, keeping the United States at the forefront of global science, and diversity as a driver of innovation.

  • Infrastructure in the Anthropocene

    Humans are rapidly approaching a period of destabilization that requires new thinking and competencies for how we approach infrastructure into the future.

    It’s time to rethink the relationship with the core systems that serve as the backbone for virtually every activity and service that society demands. New accelerating and interactive forces are redefining what infrastructure can and should do, and how it should function on a planet dominated by human systems. Read the first chapter of Mikhail Chester and Braden Allenby’s indispensable new book, The Rightful Place of Science: Infrastructure in the Anthropocene.

  • 17 Visions of Our Postpandemic World

    COVID-19 marks a transition between a past where we were much less prepared than we should have been, and a future that invites us to try to do better.

  • Science policy: For the public, by the public

    An ASU team led by CSPO Associate Director Mahmud Farooque calls on the Biden administration to create a special Participatory Technology Assessment unit to support policy decisionmaking.

    The team, in collaboration with the Day One Project, suggests that the outcomes of science and technology decisionmaking will improve through dialogue with informed, nonexpert citizens who are generally underrepresented in science and technology policymaking.

  • Not That Smart

    AI should serve, not compete with, human intelligence

    AI should advance human agency, rather than replace it. How can we assure that AI design and policy is human-centered?

  • Out of Chaos Comes Creativity and Innovation

    What Nurses Know About Innovating “In the Here and Now”

    The pandemic has shattered norms of medical knowledge production, revealing the key role of nurses—and trust—in innovation.

  • Illustration by Alice Mollon

    Who should have a say on editing DNA?

    ASU Consortium for Science, Policy and Outcomes joins global efforts to bring public values for anticipatory governance of gene editing technologies

    CSPO is working on a series of three closely connected projects to assist with global citizen deliberations on gene editing. These efforts reinforce a call from 25 leading researchers from around the world for the creation of national and global “citizens’ assemblies,” made up of lay-people, tasked with considering the societal implications of this emerging science.