CSPO Conversations

Occasional Encounters in Science, Society and Policy

CSPO conversations are occasional dialogues and collective reflections, among thought leaders, partners and collaborators, on contemporary issues at the intersections of science, society and policy — from the perils of remaining captive to a “scientific-technological elite” to pragmatic actions in dealing with climate change.

  • National Priorities for Adapting to Global Warming

    Join us for the launch of the Summer 2018 Issues in Science and Technology!

    How can climate adaptation become a national priority?

    Bruce Guile, president and cofounder of the New Advisory Group, and Raj Pandya, the founding director of the Thriving Earth Exchange at the American Geophysical Union, will address exactly that question. They will discuss “Adapting to Global Warming: Four National Priorities,” their clear-eyed assessment of the policy steps needed to use human ingenuity to confront climate change.

    Please join us as these experts bring decades of experience in climate policy to bear on the urgent question of how best to adapt to a warmer future.

    Date

    August 09, 2018 8:30am—10:30am

    Location Information

    ASU Barrett & O’Connor Center Washington Center

    1800 I Street NW

    Washington, DC 20006

    Links

  • Debunking the “War on Coal”

    Join us for the launch of the Winter 2018 Issues in Science and Technology!

    Charles Herrick and Ana Unruh Cohen will discuss how US greenhouse gas regulations affect the coal industry and other energy sectors. They will look at what other factors have led to a decline in the country’s coal use, and how these forces might shape US energy production in the future.

    Please join us as these experts explore past and present environmental regulations in the United States, and what the current situation could mean for the future.

    Date

    February 27, 2018 8:30am—10:30am

    Location Information

    Please note the new location!

    New York University Washington, DC Center

    1307 L Street NW
    Washington, DC 20005

    Links

  • Make America Innovate Again

    Join us for the launch of the Summer 2017 Issues in Science and Technology!

    Richard Van Atta, an adjunct research staff member at the Institute for Defense Analyses and an adjunct professor at Georgetown University, will discuss what we can learn from the Defense Department and DARPA—about effective partnerships, priorities, and policymaking—in advancing innovation in a variety of essential fields. By partnering with private industry and academia on mission-driven goals, DARPA pioneered some of today’s most vital technologies, including the internet, GPS, and autonomous vehicles.

    Date

    July 18, 2017 8:30am—10:30am

    Location Information

    ASU Washington Center
    1834 Connecticut Ave NW
    Washington, DC 20009

    Links

  • The End of Insight?

    Drawing from his essay in the Spring 2017 Issues in Science and Technology and from his new book, What Algorithms Want: Imagination in the Age of Computing, Ed Finn will explore how computer-generated knowledge is affecting scientific research, and how humans can become better users and architects of these powerful algorithms.

    Date

    March 29, 2017 8:30am—10:30am

    Location Information

    ASU Washington Center
    1834 Connecticut Ave
    Washington, DC 20009

  • Confronting Scientific Controversies: Do Facts Matter?

    In science journalism, topics like genetically modified organisms, climate change, and vaccines have become so controversial that reporting on them can endanger one’s career. How have we gotten here? What are the consequences of such a toxic situation? What deeper disagreements are at play in these scientific controversies? Will understanding them help society address these broader issues?

     

    Date

    January 27, 2017 8:30am—10:30am

    Location Information

    ASU Washington Center
    1834 Connecticut Ave
    Washington, DC 20009

    Links

  • Future Directions of Usable Science for Rangeland Sustainability

    As funding for rangeland research becomes more difficult to secure, researchers and funding organizations must ensure that the information needs of public and private land managers are met. Usable science that involves the intended end users through the scientific enterprise and gives rise to improved outcomes and informed management on the ground should be emphasized. The Sustainable Rangelands Roundtable workshop on Future Directions of Usable Science for Rangeland Sustainability brought together university and agency researchers, public and private land managers and producers, non-governmental organizations, and representatives of funding agencies and organizations to initiate the process of charting a research agenda for future directions of usable science for rangeland sustainability. Workshop outcomes address issues and research questions for soil health, water, vegetation (plants), animals, and socio-economic aspects of rangeland sustainability. A special issue of the journal Rangelands summarizes these outcomes, and will provided to session attendees. Presentations will be followed by a moderated discussion.

    Date

    June 15, 2016 5:00pm—7:00pm

    Location Information

    ASU Washington Center
    1834 Connecticut Ave NW
    Washington, DC 20009

    Links

    Additional Information

    For additional information, please contact Dr. Kristie Maczko, [email protected]

  • Citizen Science: Empowering a Robust National Effort

    Anyone can learn how to use the scientific method in ways that contribute to investigations of how nature works and applying that understanding to develop new technologies. As professional scientists explore the universe, they find instances and places where more hands, eyes, and voices are needed to collect, analyze, and report data: Examples include documenting the biology and chemistry around rivers and lakes, monitoring the weather in sparsely populated regions, or logging the daily course of a disease or exercise regimen. Citizen scientists are increasingly answering the call, be it as enthusiastic hobbyists, STEM students augmenting their learning, or empowered friends and family of medical patients. This panel will discuss how various citizens are enhancing the nation’s scientific enterprise as well as ensuring that the government maximizes its benefits while avoiding any negative impact on the progress of science.

    Date

    June 07, 2016 12:00pm—1:30pm

    Location Information

    Russell Senate Office Building, SR-385
    2 Constitution Ave NE, Washington, DC 20002

    Links

  • Climate Change: This Time, It’s Personal

    Personal narratives can provide the diversity of voices and values needed to effectively confront the complex challenges of a changing world. In a provocative new essay, award-winning environmental journalist Andrew C. Revkin brings forth one of these vital stories: his own. Chronicling the shifts in his thinking (and writing) over thirty years of covering climate change for outlets like the New York Times, he concludes, surprisingly, “global warming doesn’t worry me.”

    Please join us for a wide-ranging conversation with Andrew about the challenges of writing about climate change and making an impact on readers through personal narrative. He will be joined by Lee Gutkind, founding editor of Creative Nonfiction, and Daniel Sarewitz, co-editor of Issues in Science and Technology; Andrew’s essay appears in the current issues of both magazines.

    Date

    February 29, 2016 6:30pm—8:30pm

    Location Information

    Marian Koshland Science Museum
    525 E Street NW
    Washington, DC 20001