CSPO News

  • Engaging Citizens to Inform Governance of Controversial Research

    How should solar geoengineering research be governed to address risks and uncertainties?

    A groundbreaking new CSPO project explores the potential for citizens to usefully inform the governance of solar geoengineering research.

  • Frankenstein

    On the bicentennial of its publication, what does the classic gothic tale tell us today about science, technology, and society?

    Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein is far richer and more relevant to contemporary issues than its common use as a warning against scientific hubris. Essays in the newest Rightful Place of Science volume use Shelley’s tale to launch an exploration of creativity and responsibility across literary, scientific, social, and cultural dimensions.

  • Fall 2017 Issues in Science and Technology

    The new issue features a special editorial package on science and religion.

    If stories are especially good at making sense of the ambiguities and contradictions of the human condition, what stories might communicate a more complex and even fruitful relationship between science and religion?

  • Two Decades of Focusing on Adaptation and Resilience

    Recent climate-related disasters have highlighted, once again, the importance of adaptation.

    CSPO and its partners have been working to draw attention to adaptation for nearly two decades. For communities beginning to rebuild after a disaster and those developing their resilience strategies, this body of work offers new ways to think about adaptation and its many benefits.

  • Demolishing the Miracle Machine Myth

    The CSPO summer 2017 update on the new "Issues in Science and Technology," the latest Rightful Place of Science book, and more!

    CSPO has a number of new publications, event, and projects that we optimistically think can push public discussions and policies around science and technology in new and fruitful directions.

  • Summer 2017 Issues in Science and Technology

    Now is no time for rubbernecking, according to Kevin Finneran, the editor-in-chief of "Issues in Science and Technology."

    Instead of wasting our time transfixed by the wreckage of a presidential administration mired in scandal and incompetence, we should be building an alternative program for guiding the country. The articles in the Summer 2017 Issues aim to do just that, to tackle the fundamental aspects of science and society that will shape the world’s future direction.

  • Climate Pragmatism

    How can we move past divisive climate politics and make progress on tackling climate change? The latest volume in "The Rightful Place of Science" series identifies innovative new strategies.

    There is a robust and growing demand for a more pragmatic approach to the climate challenge. The newest Rightful Place of Science volume, Climate Pragmatism, brings together powerful ideas for meeting this demand. The starting point of this new approach is a commitment to human dignity and the potential for innovation to drive economic prosperity and protect the lives and livelihoods of billions of people. Driven by pragmatic and inclusive political strategies, this new framework focuses on energy access, energy innovation, and climate adaptation.

  • How Can Citizens Help Create More Resilient Communities?

    A new program engages diverse groups of people on ways to reduce their vulnerability to climate hazards.

    Communities around the United States face a number of climate-related hazards, including sea level rise, extreme precipitation, drought, and heat waves. An innovative new forum program from ECAST brings citizens together to learn about these hazards and discuss strategies for improving their resilience.