CSPO Conversations

Occasional Encounters in Science, Society and Policy

CSPO conversations are occasional dialogues and collective reflections, among thought leaders, partners and collaborators, on contemporary issues at the intersections of science, society and policy — from the perils of remaining captive to a “scientific-technological elite” to pragmatic actions in dealing with climate change.

  • Reinventing Climate Change

    Climate policy is broken. A huge part of the problem is the way climate change and the policies intended to address it are framed and communicated. Pragmatic and tangible options for tackling climate change are often overlooked in a contentious debate focused on climate change deniers, symbolic actions like opposition to the Keystone XL pipeline, and overheated rhetoric about a coming climate apocalypse. This tired narrative seems to have accomplished little beyond breeding cynicism and apathy across a broad swath of the global public. How do we enlarge and enrich this conversation, and take pragmatic steps toward a positive future? Can we connect climate policy and other environmental concerns to actions that provide near-term benefits for society while enhancing our capacity to deal with climate change in the long run?

    Date

    January 16, 2015 9:00am—10:30am

    Location Information

    ASU Washington Center 
    1834 Connecticut Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20009

  • Teamwork in Science: Optimizing Collaboration

    Science is a human endeavor, often conducted by teams of researchers. The human interactions between team members can mean some projects flourish or exceed their goals while other studies flounder or crumble. In a world with limited resources to support complex or high-stakes scientific research, understanding effective team structures can inform science policy and research priority decisions. This panel will bring their experience from different scientific research sectors and ideas on how scientists can build productive teams and avoid dysfunctional collaborations.

    Date

    December 09, 2014 5:00pm—7:30pm

    Location Information

    American Chemical Society Headquarters, Othmer Rooms A & B (1550 M St. NW, DC)

    Additional Information

    Presented By: American Chemical Society and Consortium for Science, Policy and Outcomes

  • Envisioning and Deliberating Differently

    As technology becomes more complex and pervasive in society, its potential impact on urban environments and citizens’ day-to-day lives grows. Ensuring that the publics have the opportunity to understand, respond to, and influence future directions related to innovation is therefore imperative for upholding a truly democratic society. In an effort to create a more inclusive, sustainable, and integrated public engagement and deliberation experiences, researchers at the Center for Nanotechnology in Society at Arizona State University (CNS-ASU) developed the Futurescape City Tours (FCTs).  Please join us for a photographic and experiential journey through the citizen’s eye and a conversation among participants, designers, facilitators, and scientists of the FCT in Washington DC.

    Date

    October 22, 2014 5:30pm—8:00pm

    Location Information

    ASU Washington Center, 1834 Connecticut Ave NW, Washington, DC 20009

    Additional Information

    Presented by:  ASU Consortium for Science, Policy & Outcomes (CSPO) and ASU Center for Nanotechnology in Society

  • Is STEM Crisis a Myth?

    It’s an issue that has been repeated in countless reports and news stories: the United States is facing a looming shortage of scientists, technologists, engineers, and mathematicians—a STEM crisis, that is. It’s time for a reasoned, informed dialogue about STEM literacy in the United States, without the political hysterics and contrived logic. Join CSPO co-director Dan Sarewitz and Robert N. Charette, author of the recent IEEE Spectrum article, “The STEM Crisis Is a Myth,” for an in-depth look at this issue and the potential pitfalls and solutions surrounding it.

    Date

    October 07, 2013 3:00pm—4:15pm

    Location Information

    ASU Washington Center, 1834 Connecticut Ave NW, Washington, DC 20009

    Additional Information

    Presented by:  Arizona State University’s Consortium for Science, Policy & Outcomes (CSPO) and Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)

  • Eisenhower’s Farewell Address at Fifty

    President Eisenhower’s address is mainly remembered for his warning of the perils of a “military-industrial complex.” Less widely known, but no less important was his caution, a few sentences later, about “the danger that public policy could itself become the captive of a scientific-technological elite.” This seminar explored the historical context and current relevance of Eisenhower’s worries about a “scientific-technological elite.” CSPO faculty members and authors Dan Sarewitz and G. Pascal Zachary spoke, along with author and journalist Daniel S. Greenberg and journalist and former science analyst for the GAO William Lanouette. The panel was moderated by Steve Lagerfeld, editor of The Wilson Quarterly.

    Date

    January 18, 2011 4:30pm—6:00pm

    Location Information

    AAAS Auditorium, 1200 New York Ave., NW, Washington, DC

    Additional Information

    Presented by:  Arizona State University’s Consortium for Science, Policy & Outcomes (CSPO) and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)