CSPO Conversations

Occasional Encounters in Science, Society and Policy

CSPO conversations are occasional dialogues and collective reflections, among thought leaders, partners and collaborators, on contemporary issues at the intersections of science, society and policy — from the perils of remaining captive to a “scientific-technological elite” to pragmatic actions in dealing with climate change.

  • The Citizen between Science and Policy: Innovation in Governance and Climate Change Resilience

    On June 6, 2015, beginning at dawn in the Pacific Islands and ending at dusk in the American Southwest, 10,000 everyday citizens in 76 countries met to participate in the largest-ever public consultation on climate and energy. The results of the World Wide Views on Climate and Energy deliberations offer useful insight into citizens’ perspectives for addressing climate change and effecting a transition to low-carbon energy. On October 22, 2015, we will present and discuss the engagement model, key results, and policy implications of this unprecedented citizen engagement.

    Date

    October 22, 2015 3:00pm—9:00pm

    Location Information

    Embassy of France
    4101 Reservoir Road NW
    Washington, DC 20007

    Additional Information

    Reception featuring DC Climathon finalists (5:00 – 6:30 pm) & film screening of Luc Jacquet’s ICE & SKY to follow (7:00 -9:00 pm)

    Sponsored by: ASU School for Future of Innovation in Society (SFIS); ASU Consortium for Science, Policy & Outcomes (CSPO); Embassy of France in the United StatesMuseum of Science, Boston

  • Nanotechnology Policy: Evolving and Maturing

    Nanotechnology policy discussions will soon enter a third decade. The initial generation focused on setting research priorities, investigating environmental impact, and contemplating societal implications even while improving understanding of the fundamental properties of nanomaterials. As nanotechnology applications increase in number and mature, including biomedical and infrastructural contexts, how should the science policy discussion evolve? This panel will remark on lessons learned, avenues to explore, and possible means forward.

    Date

    October 09, 2015 12:00pm—1:30pm

    Location Information

    ACS Hach Building
    1155 16th St. NW, Washington, D.C.

    Additional Information

    Click here to RSVP

    If you are unable to attend, you may follow the event via livestream.

    Co-sponsored by:

    American Chemical Society
    Center for Nanotechnology in Society
    University of Notre Dame Center for Nano Science and Technology

  • Diversifying the Climate Dialogue

    Cultivating public discourse and enlarging policy discussions have been central to our work at ASU’s Consortium for Science, Policy & Outcomes (CSPO). As the next big international conference on climate change begins this fall in Paris, CSPO is pleased to host a dialog on ways to include perspectives that have not traditionally been part of the climate conversation. A diversity of voices is essential for confronting a problem as enormous as global climate change: engaging with differing perspectives helps discover innovative approaches and gains the support of citizens impacted by climate policies—policies that have often been plagued by divisiveness and gridlock. In discussing models for citizen engagement, including the recent World Wide Views deliberations on climate and energy, and by hearing from viewpoints that are frequently missing in climate debates, this CSPO Conversations event will inform and enrich our approach to climate change.

    Date

    September 21, 2015 3:00pm—5:00pm

    Location Information

    ASU Washington Center 
    1834 Connecticut Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20009

  • Fixed: The Science/Fiction of Human Enhancement

    From Botox to bionic limbs, the human body is more “upgradeable” than ever. But how much of it can we alter and still be human? What do we gain or lose in the process? Haunting and humorous, poignant and political, Fixed rethinks “disability” and “normalcy” by exploring technologies that promise to change our bodies and minds forever. Since its release a little over one year ago, Fixed has screened in film festivals around the world and as a keynote at 7 academic and professional conferences. Most recently the United Nations licensed the film for their work on the Convention for the Rights of People with Disabilities.

    Date

    March 03, 2015 7:00pm—9:00pm

    Additional Information

    Presented By: United Spinal Association, Autistic Self Advocacy Network, DC Center for Independent Living, Consortium for Science, Policy & Outcomes, and Capital Cab.

    Location Information

    St. Stephen’s Church, 1525 Newton St NW, Washington, D.C. 20010

  • Reinventing Climate Change

    Climate policy is broken. A huge part of the problem is the way climate change and the policies intended to address it are framed and communicated. Pragmatic and tangible options for tackling climate change are often overlooked in a contentious debate focused on climate change deniers, symbolic actions like opposition to the Keystone XL pipeline, and overheated rhetoric about a coming climate apocalypse. This tired narrative seems to have accomplished little beyond breeding cynicism and apathy across a broad swath of the global public. How do we enlarge and enrich this conversation, and take pragmatic steps toward a positive future? Can we connect climate policy and other environmental concerns to actions that provide near-term benefits for society while enhancing our capacity to deal with climate change in the long run?

    Date

    January 16, 2015 9:00am—10:30am

    Location Information

    ASU Washington Center 
    1834 Connecticut Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20009

  • Teamwork in Science: Optimizing Collaboration

    Science is a human endeavor, often conducted by teams of researchers. The human interactions between team members can mean some projects flourish or exceed their goals while other studies flounder or crumble. In a world with limited resources to support complex or high-stakes scientific research, understanding effective team structures can inform science policy and research priority decisions. This panel will bring their experience from different scientific research sectors and ideas on how scientists can build productive teams and avoid dysfunctional collaborations.

    Date

    December 09, 2014 5:00pm—7:30pm

    Location Information

    American Chemical Society Headquarters, Othmer Rooms A & B (1550 M St. NW, DC)

    Additional Information

    Presented By: American Chemical Society and Consortium for Science, Policy and Outcomes

  • Envisioning and Deliberating Differently

    As technology becomes more complex and pervasive in society, its potential impact on urban environments and citizens’ day-to-day lives grows. Ensuring that the publics have the opportunity to understand, respond to, and influence future directions related to innovation is therefore imperative for upholding a truly democratic society. In an effort to create a more inclusive, sustainable, and integrated public engagement and deliberation experiences, researchers at the Center for Nanotechnology in Society at Arizona State University (CNS-ASU) developed the Futurescape City Tours (FCTs).  Please join us for a photographic and experiential journey through the citizen’s eye and a conversation among participants, designers, facilitators, and scientists of the FCT in Washington DC.

    Date

    October 22, 2014 5:30pm—8:00pm

    Location Information

    ASU Washington Center, 1834 Connecticut Ave NW, Washington, DC 20009

    Additional Information

    Presented by:  ASU Consortium for Science, Policy & Outcomes (CSPO) and ASU Center for Nanotechnology in Society

  • Is STEM Crisis a Myth?

    It’s an issue that has been repeated in countless reports and news stories: the United States is facing a looming shortage of scientists, technologists, engineers, and mathematicians—a STEM crisis, that is. It’s time for a reasoned, informed dialogue about STEM literacy in the United States, without the political hysterics and contrived logic. Join CSPO co-director Dan Sarewitz and Robert N. Charette, author of the recent IEEE Spectrum article, “The STEM Crisis Is a Myth,” for an in-depth look at this issue and the potential pitfalls and solutions surrounding it.

    Date

    October 07, 2013 3:00pm—4:15pm

    Location Information

    ASU Washington Center, 1834 Connecticut Ave NW, Washington, DC 20009

    Additional Information

    Presented by:  Arizona State University’s Consortium for Science, Policy & Outcomes (CSPO) and Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)