• Spring 2017 Issues in Science and Technology

    The latest "Issues" looks at climate engineering, big science projects, diversifying the research community, and more.

    The Spring 2017 “Issues in Science and Technology” explores the potential for intervening directly in the climate system to address the risks posed by climate change. Experts look at ways to responsibly research geoengineering, the governance of a geoengineering program, and the feasibility of capturing carbon directly out of the atmosphere.

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  • CSPO Named in Top 10 Science & Technology Think Tanks Worldwide

    The 2016 Global Go To Think Tank Index lists CSPO near the top of global think tanks on science and technology.

    For the third year in a row, the Consortium for Science, Policy & Outcomes has been ranked among the world’s top ten science and technology think tanks.

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  • How Does Better Governance Improve Resilience to Climate Change?

    A new report explores the benefits of building climate resilience through good governance.

    Building on the insights of leaders in government, industry, academia, and other sectors, “Climate Change Resilience: Governance and Reforms” examines how good governance actions can support climate resilience efforts.

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  • Confronting Scientific Controversies: Do Facts Matter?

    Keith Kloor and Dan Hicks launch the Winter 2017 "Issues in Science and Technology" in this CSPO Conversations event

    Topics like genetically modified organisms, climate change, and vaccines have become so controversial that reporting on them can endanger a journalist’s career. What are the consequences of such a toxic situation? What deeper disagreements are at play in these scientific controversies?

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  • Winter 2017 Issues in Science and Technology

    The newest "Issues" explores clean energy transitions, the perils of science journalism, infrastructure and democracy, and more.

    The Winter 2017 “Issues in Science and Technology” examines the global energy system’s transition from fossil fuels to cleaner alternatives, finding signs of progress (and some discouraging failures) everywhere from India to Germany to the United States.

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  • Science & Religion Writing Competition

    $17,500 in Prize Money. Submissions Due December 12, 2016

    Creative Nonfiction and Issues in Science and Technology are seeking original narratives illustrating and exploring the relationships, tensions, and harmonies between science and religion—the ways these two forces productively challenge each other as well as the ways in which they can work together and strengthen one another.

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The Consortium for Science, Policy & Outcomes

Is an intellectual network aimed at enhancing the contribution of science and technology to society’s pursuit of equality, justice, freedom, and overall quality of life. The Consortium creates knowledge and methods, cultivates public discourse, and fosters policies to help decision makers and institutions grapple with the immense power and importance of science and technology as society charts a course for the future.

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Blog: As We Now Think

Eight Science Policy Career Tips from a Presidential Management Fellow

Jordan Hibbs is a 2015 graduate of the Master of Science and Technology Policy (MSTP) program, now at ASU’s School for the Future of Innovation in Society. She is currently serving a two-year appointment as a Presidential Management Fellow at the U.S. Department of Energy, Building Technologies Office in Washington, DC. This post originally appeared […]

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How to Lose Friends and Alienate People

A couple of weeks ago, Bret Stephens, the new columnist for The New York Times, wrote a fairly anodyne inaugural essay about the dangers of complete certainty, particularly certainty based on data-dependent predictive modeling. “We live in a world in which data convey authority,” he writes. “But authority has a way of descending to certitude, […]

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It’s Not a War on Science

Know your enemy, Sun Tzu reminds us in The Art of War. Science is in a war, but not the one many think. To avoid costly mistakes, scientists and those who support them need to know and understand the forces in the field. Those forces are not engaged in an attack on science—or the truth. […]

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