CSPO Conversations

Occasional Encounters in Science, Society and Policy

CSPO conversations are occasional dialogues and collective reflections, among thought leaders, partners and collaborators, on contemporary issues at the intersections of science, society and policy — from the perils of remaining captive to a “scientific-technological elite” to pragmatic actions in dealing with climate change.

  • Confronting Scientific Controversies: Do Facts Matter?

    In science journalism, topics like genetically modified organisms, climate change, and vaccines have become so controversial that reporting on them can endanger one’s career. How have we gotten here? What are the consequences of such a toxic situation? What deeper disagreements are at play in these scientific controversies? Will understanding them help society address these broader issues?

     

    Date

    January 27, 2017 8:30am—10:30am

    Location Information

    ASU Washington Center
    1834 Connecticut Ave
    Washington, DC 20009

    Links

  • Future Directions of Usable Science for Rangeland Sustainability

    As funding for rangeland research becomes more difficult to secure, researchers and funding organizations must ensure that the information needs of public and private land managers are met. Usable science that involves the intended end users through the scientific enterprise and gives rise to improved outcomes and informed management on the ground should be emphasized. The Sustainable Rangelands Roundtable workshop on Future Directions of Usable Science for Rangeland Sustainability brought together university and agency researchers, public and private land managers and producers, non-governmental organizations, and representatives of funding agencies and organizations to initiate the process of charting a research agenda for future directions of usable science for rangeland sustainability. Workshop outcomes address issues and research questions for soil health, water, vegetation (plants), animals, and socio-economic aspects of rangeland sustainability. A special issue of the journal Rangelands summarizes these outcomes, and will provided to session attendees. Presentations will be followed by a moderated discussion.

  • Citizen Science: Empowering a Robust National Effort

    Anyone can learn how to use the scientific method in ways that contribute to investigations of how nature works and applying that understanding to develop new technologies. As professional scientists explore the universe, they find instances and places where more hands, eyes, and voices are needed to collect, analyze, and report data: Examples include documenting the biology and chemistry around rivers and lakes, monitoring the weather in sparsely populated regions, or logging the daily course of a disease or exercise regimen. Citizen scientists are increasingly answering the call, be it as enthusiastic hobbyists, STEM students augmenting their learning, or empowered friends and family of medical patients. This panel will discuss how various citizens are enhancing the nation’s scientific enterprise as well as ensuring that the government maximizes its benefits while avoiding any negative impact on the progress of science.

    Date

    June 07, 2016 12:00pm—1:30pm

    Location Information

    Russell Senate Office Building, SR-385
    2 Constitution Ave NE, Washington, DC 20002

    Links

  • Climate Change: This Time, It’s Personal

    Personal narratives can provide the diversity of voices and values needed to effectively confront the complex challenges of a changing world. In a provocative new essay, award-winning environmental journalist Andrew C. Revkin brings forth one of these vital stories: his own. Chronicling the shifts in his thinking (and writing) over thirty years of covering climate change for outlets like the New York Times, he concludes, surprisingly, “global warming doesn’t worry me.”

    Please join us for a wide-ranging conversation with Andrew about the challenges of writing about climate change and making an impact on readers through personal narrative. He will be joined by Lee Gutkind, founding editor of Creative Nonfiction, and Daniel Sarewitz, co-editor of Issues in Science and Technology; Andrew’s essay appears in the current issues of both magazines.

    Date

    February 29, 2016 6:30pm—8:30pm

    Location Information

    Marian Koshland Science Museum
    525 E Street NW
    Washington, DC 20001

  • The Citizen between Science and Policy: Innovation in Governance and Climate Change Resilience

    On June 6, 2015, beginning at dawn in the Pacific Islands and ending at dusk in the American Southwest, 10,000 everyday citizens in 76 countries met to participate in the largest-ever public consultation on climate and energy. The results of the World Wide Views on Climate and Energy deliberations offer useful insight into citizens’ perspectives for addressing climate change and effecting a transition to low-carbon energy. On October 22, 2015, we will present and discuss the engagement model, key results, and policy implications of this unprecedented citizen engagement.

    Date

    October 22, 2015 3:00pm—9:00pm

    Location Information

    Embassy of France
    4101 Reservoir Road NW
    Washington, DC 20007

    Additional Information

    Reception featuring DC Climathon finalists (5:00 – 6:30 pm) & film screening of Luc Jacquet’s ICE & SKY to follow (7:00 -9:00 pm)

    Sponsored by: ASU School for Future of Innovation in Society (SFIS); ASU Consortium for Science, Policy & Outcomes (CSPO); Embassy of France in the United StatesMuseum of Science, Boston

  • Nanotechnology Policy: Evolving and Maturing

    Nanotechnology policy discussions will soon enter a third decade. The initial generation focused on setting research priorities, investigating environmental impact, and contemplating societal implications even while improving understanding of the fundamental properties of nanomaterials. As nanotechnology applications increase in number and mature, including biomedical and infrastructural contexts, how should the science policy discussion evolve? This panel will remark on lessons learned, avenues to explore, and possible means forward.

    Date

    October 09, 2015 12:00pm—1:30pm

    Location Information

    ACS Hach Building
    1155 16th St. NW, Washington, D.C.

    Additional Information

    Click here to RSVP

    If you are unable to attend, you may follow the event via livestream.

    Co-sponsored by:

    American Chemical Society
    Center for Nanotechnology in Society
    University of Notre Dame Center for Nano Science and Technology

  • Diversifying the Climate Dialogue

    Cultivating public discourse and enlarging policy discussions have been central to our work at ASU’s Consortium for Science, Policy & Outcomes (CSPO). As the next big international conference on climate change begins this fall in Paris, CSPO is pleased to host a dialog on ways to include perspectives that have not traditionally been part of the climate conversation. A diversity of voices is essential for confronting a problem as enormous as global climate change: engaging with differing perspectives helps discover innovative approaches and gains the support of citizens impacted by climate policies—policies that have often been plagued by divisiveness and gridlock. In discussing models for citizen engagement, including the recent World Wide Views deliberations on climate and energy, and by hearing from viewpoints that are frequently missing in climate debates, this CSPO Conversations event will inform and enrich our approach to climate change.

    Date

    September 21, 2015 3:00pm—5:00pm

    Location Information

    ASU Washington Center 
    1834 Connecticut Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20009

  • Fixed: The Science/Fiction of Human Enhancement

    From Botox to bionic limbs, the human body is more “upgradeable” than ever. But how much of it can we alter and still be human? What do we gain or lose in the process? Haunting and humorous, poignant and political, Fixed rethinks “disability” and “normalcy” by exploring technologies that promise to change our bodies and minds forever. Since its release a little over one year ago, Fixed has screened in film festivals around the world and as a keynote at 7 academic and professional conferences. Most recently the United Nations licensed the film for their work on the Convention for the Rights of People with Disabilities.

    Date

    March 03, 2015 7:00pm—9:00pm

    Additional Information

    Presented By: United Spinal Association, Autistic Self Advocacy Network, DC Center for Independent Living, Consortium for Science, Policy & Outcomes, and Capital Cab.

    Location Information

    St. Stephen’s Church, 1525 Newton St NW, Washington, D.C. 20010